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Whistler

Posted by andydansby on Oct 14, 2009 in AOP Templates
Morocco_Man_DAP_Whistler

Whistler

James Abbott McNeill Whistler (July 11, 1834 – July 17, 1903) was an American-born, British-based artist. Averse to sentimentality and moral allusion in painting, he was a leading proponent of the credo “art for art’s sake”. His famous signature for his paintings was in the shape of a stylized butterfly possessing a long stinger for a tail.  The symbol was apt, for it combined both aspects of his personality—his art was characterized by a subtle delicacy, while his public persona was combative. Finding a parallel between painting and music, Whistler titled many of his paintings “arrangements”, “harmonies”, and “nocturnes”, emphasizing the primacy of tonal harmony.  His most famous painting is the iconic Whistler’s Mother, the revered and oft parodied portrait of motherhood. A wit, dandy, and shameless self-promoter, Whistler influenced the art world and the broader culture of his time with his artistic theories and his friendships with leading artists and writers.   From Wikipedia. Read more…

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Jean-Honoré Fragonard

Posted by andydansby on Oct 14, 2009 in AOP Templates

Kiss_DAP_FragonardJean-Honoré Fragonard ; 5 April 1732 – 22 August 1806) was a French painter and printmaker whose late Rococo manner was distinguished by remarkable facility, exuberance, and hedonism. One of the most prolific artists active in the last decades of the Ancien Régime, Fragonard produced more than 550 paintings (not counting drawings and etchings), of which only five are dated. Among his most popular works are genre paintings conveying an atmosphere of intimacy and veiled eroticism.  From Wikipedia. Read more…

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Bob Ross

Posted by andydansby on Oct 14, 2009 in AOP Templates
Bob Ross AOP of Fall Leaves, photo taken in upstate NY

Bob Ross AOP of Fall Leaves, photo taken in upstate NY

Bob Norman Ross (October 29, 1942 – July 4, 1995) was an American painter, art instructor, and television host.  Ross utilized the wet-on-wet oil painting technique, in which the painter continues adding paint on top of still wet paint rather than waiting a lengthy amount of time to allow each layer of paint to dry.[3] Combining this method with the use of two inch and other types of brushes as well as painting knives allowed Ross to paint trees, water, clouds and mountains in a matter of seconds. Each painting would start with simple strokes that appeared to be nothing more than colored smudges. As he added more and more strokes, the blotches transformed into intricate landscapes.  From Wikipedia. Read more…

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